Category Archives: Lecture Series

A series of lectures held at the Römisch Germanisches Zentralmusum Mainz, Germany during summer and autumn 2016.

Warrior Treasure: the Anglo-Saxon ‘Staffordshire Hoard’ after seven years of research

Chris Fern MA FSA, The Staffordshire Hoard Project

The Staffordshire Hoard is the largest ever find of Anglo-Saxon treasure, of gold, silver and garnet objects, at around 5kg. It was found in 2009 by a metal-detectorist and became an international sensation. Following seven years of conservation cleaning and reconstruction work, some seven-hundred objects have now been identified, from an original 4500 fragments. Most are fittings from richly-decorated swords, which were the possessions of warriors and maybe even princes and kings. Some were decorated with the sacred symbols of gods, both pagan and Christian. Other objects include a rare helmet and a small but significant collection of Christian items, including pectoral and processional crosses. Dating to the 7th century AD, the hoard shows us an early England that was wealthy and capable of great artistic achievement, but in an age of violence and warfare, and driven by the politics of the warband.

Dienstag, den 18. Oktober, 18.15 Uhr

Römisch-Germanisches Zentralmuseum – Vortragssaal

Im Rahmen der Vortragsreihe “Weltweites Zellwerk”

See the full program here!

 

Foto: (c) http://www.staffordshirehoard.org.uk

Gemstones and Gem Deposits of Sri Lanka – with special emphasis on Geology, Occurrence , Varieties and Mining.

Dr. Gamini Zoysa, Ceylon Gemmological Services

Sri Lanka has long been known as one of the world’s most important gem producing countries. Specially as a leading source for fine quality Blue Sapphires & its other varieties. The genesis of gemstones in Sri Lanka has been a subject for much discussion. The gems are mostly mined from the alluvial deposits underlain by Precambrian metamorphic rocks. The main gem bearing areas are confined to the geological division called highland complex which is located in the central part of the country. Over 3200 legal gem mines have been in active operation in the past years. The depth of the gem gravel in a shaft may vary from 10 to 25 meters. There are also evidences for occurrence of primary deposits of Sapphire, Moonstone , Aquamarine, Garnet within the island. In addition to the major commercially viable gem varieties such as Sapphires, Garnet, Chrysoberyl, Topaz, Zircon, Moonstone, Tourmaline, Beryl, Quartz there are over 80 varieties of nontraditional gems are recorded.

Dienstag, den 25. Oktober, 18.15 Uhr

Römisch-Germanisches Zentralmuseum – Vortragssaal

Im Rahmen der Vortragsreihe “Weltweites Zellwerk”

See the full program here!

 

Foto: (c) http://www.aigsthailand.com

Auf der Suche nach dem Karfunkelstein. Granatabbau und Verarbeitung im heutigen Rajasthan, Indien.

Dr. des. Borayin Larios, Ruprecht-Karls-Universität Heidelberg

talks about his field trip to India where he was searching for garnet mines and gemstone cutters in contemporary Rajasthan.
In this region garnet has been mined already in the early Middle Ages when it found its way to Europe.

Dienstag, den 11. Oktober, 18.15 Uhr

Römisch-Germanisches Zentralmuseum – Vortragssaal

In diesem Vortrag werden die Ergebnisse der im Jahr 2014 durchgeführten Feldforschung in Rajasthan, Indien im Rahmen des Projektes „Granat in historischen und archäologischen Quellen aus Südasien“ vorgestellt. Dabei wird versucht durch eine systematische Suche nach archäologischen und historischen Zeugnissen in Südasien den Weg des Edelsteins von der Mine bis zum Hafen nachzuvollziehen. Das Material, welches hier vorgestellt wird, dokumentiert, unter anderem, die Abbauquellen für Almandin-und-Pyrop-reichen Granatstein, so wie auch die rezenten und traditionellen Verarbeitungstechniken von Granat in regionalen Minen in den Distrikten Tonk und Ajmer und Edelsteinschleifereien in der Hauptstadt Jaipur. In dieser Region wurde bereits im frühen Mittelalter Granat abgebaut, der seinen Weg bis nach Europa fand. Das indologische Forschungsprojekt ist am Südasien-Institut der Universität Heidelberg beheimatet und Teil des „Weltweiten Zellwerk“-Projekts.

This is the abstract of the presentation held during the lecture series in summer/autumn 2016.

See the full program here!

Garnet jewellery in Norway: The Norwegian disc-on-bow brooches and Viking memories

Ann Zanette Tsigaridas Glørstad & Ingunn Marit Røstad,  Museum of Cultural History, Oslo

The continental tradition with the use of garnets in jewellery from the early Middle Ages spread north up to Norway during the 6th and 7th centuries, albeit used in a much lesser degree. Garnets are, however, frequently used in the so-called disc-on-bow brooches. These are one of the most spectacular jewellery types we know of from this period in Scandinavia. They are usually made of gilded copper alloy and the surface is covered with garnets set in cloisonné technique. The manufacturing of the brooches take place in the period between c. 550–800 AD, i.e. the period leading up to the Viking Age. However, many of the brooches have been found in Viking graves, and are thus quite old when buried. How is this phenomenon to be understood?

This is the abstract of the presentation held during the lecture series in summer/autumn 2016.

See the full program here!

Jewellery and elite networks in Early Medieval Europe: some initial findings

Toby Martin, University of Oxford

During the fifth to seventh centuries AD, an ostentatious style of feminine dress flourished in Europe featuring large and decorative brooches. Thanks to the simultaneous (and perhaps not coincidental) rise of the furnished burial rite, thousands of these objects survive in museum collections. The geographical scale of this style was unprecedented, covering most of modern day Europe, from Norway to lowland Britain and Iberia, across to the Ukraine and up into the Baltic. As such, its analysis has much to tell us about contacts between populations in Europe, and how they used styles of jewellery as a means of creating and negotiating a material and social network. Traditionally, this material has been analysed using typology with the aim of grouping the material to reveal information about migration or ethnicity and more recently other forms of identity. Therefore, both the subject of enquiry and the method used in its investigation have a stated aim to reduce complex relationships into delineated groupings populated by objects or by people. In this presentation a new Europe-wide database of this material will be introduced and used to illustrate the possibilities of an alternative means of investigation. Instead of typology, a formal network analysis will be used to switch the focus of attention to the complex relationships between objects, and the web of linkages that these relationships create when examined en masse.

This is the abstract of the presentation held during the lecture series in summer/autumn 2016.

See the full program here!