All posts by alexandrahilgner

Garnet Jewellery in Early Medieval Sweden

Deutsche Version | Team

Present-day Sweden has a large and varied garnet material from the Iron Age. Even if there are finds dating back to the Late Roman Period most objects derive from the 5th to 8th centuries. In Sweden this time period is called the Migration and Vendel Period, and it is characterised by its regional power structures, wealthy burials and far-reaching networks of contacts. Most of the garnets are part of jewellery such as brooches but also adorning high status weaponry etc. Continue reading Garnet Jewellery in Early Medieval Sweden

Garnet on the North-western Periphery of the Merovingian Empire during the 7th Century

Deutsche Version | Team

The objective of this subproject is the archaeological and scientific analysis of garnet objects from England, Scotland and Scandinavia. The question is, why objects decorated with garnet went out of fashion on the Continent during the last third of the 6th century, while the style experienced a notable floruit in 7th-century England and Scandinavia. Continue reading Garnet on the North-western Periphery of the Merovingian Empire during the 7th Century

The Development of Cloisonné between India and the Byzantine Empire

Deutsche Version | Team

This subproject is concerned with basic research that is to say with the question of origin and stylistic development of cloisonné between India and the Byzantine Empire. Following a careful chronological classification, significant insight will be gained through a combination of published finds and some of the objects from the collections of the RGZM originating in this vast geographic area. Continue reading The Development of Cloisonné between India and the Byzantine Empire

Towards an Understanding of Anglo-Saxon Stone Names

Deutsche Version | Team

Garnets are ubiquitous in the material culture of Anglo-Saxon England. They appear on buckles, brooches, shoulder clasps, and sieve spoons. They once lined the wings of a dragon on what is possibly the most famous Anglo-Saxon artefact, the helmet from the Sutton Hoo ship burial. Their beauty was, perhaps, imitated in ink and vellum in images which sought to recreate the beauty of jewels on manuscript. Continue reading Towards an Understanding of Anglo-Saxon Stone Names

International Framework / Weltweites Zellwerk

Deutsche Version | Team

Changes in the cultural significance of early medieval gemstone jewellery considered against the background of economic history and the transfer of ideas and technologies

In large parts of 5th- to 8th-century Europe, thousands of items of jewellery were decorated all over in a red gemstone: garnet. As characteristic as this style is for these centuries, closer inspection nonetheless reveals not only regional variations but also differences in its social relevance. At the same time a phenomenon, which has so far received little consideration, manifests itself against the backdrop of the “Dark Ages”: In the centre of Frankish-Merovingian Europe the workmanship of this so-called cloisonné style changes from lavish, abundantly supplied, all-over cover of red garnet platelets of oriental origin to a more simple variant employing only individual chips of “indigenous” Bohemian garnet. Continue reading International Framework / Weltweites Zellwerk